England Secure Historic Series Win In India

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England Secure Historic Series Win In India

England secured their first series victory in India for 27 years this morning as Jonathan Trott and Ian Bell both hit centuries on the final day of the fourth Test in Nagpur

 

Both Trott, 143, and Bell, 116 not out, had struggled with their form for most of the series but it showed just how dominating England's performances had become as the tourists - who lost in Ahmedabad before winning in Mumbai and Kolkata - earned the draw they needed to secure an historic achievement.
India took just one wicket all day as debutant Joe Root finished with an unbeaten 20 to go with his 73 in the first innings.
With no result looking likely, time was called early to proceedings and as the bails were lifted, England were 352 for 4 with a lead of 356.
England's final-day dominance was fitting because, since being beaten by nine wickets in the first Test, the tourists, who have been notoriously poor on the sub-continent, have outplayed their hosts in every department.
While recent Ashes victories, in 2005 and the 2009-10 tour Down Under will rank as some of England's finest displays in recent years, many pundits and ex-players have described winning a Test series in India as the hardest thing to do in cricket.
To put some numbers behind the series win, this is only the fourth time in history England have won in India, and it is the first time since David Gower's team were triumphant in 1984-85.
This was the first time India had lost a home series since 2004 when the great Australia team with the likes of Glenn McGrath, Ricky Ponting, and Shane Warne and this result for England will give them a lot of confidence heading into the Ashes next Summer. 
Given the recent problems in the England camp, both on and off the field, it appears as though the squad has turned the corner with contributions from plenty of players.
 
Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar, after he was picked from the second Test onwards, both out-bowled India's spinners and James Anderson underlined his status as one of the best seamers in the world. 
A lot of the credit has to go to England's captain Alastair Cook and his pure hunger for runs which saw him pick up the man of the series award but at one time or another all of England's batsmen scored runs.
Trott and Bell were the two players most in need of some runs on the final day and both delivered with aplomb.
The Warwickshire team mates posted their highest Test scores of the year, with a century particularly welcome for Bell who averaged just 18 in India before he came to the crease when England were stuttering slightly at 94-3 on the fourth day.
Both Trott and Bell were part of the side in January which was bowled out for 72 against Pakistan, on their way to a series whitewash in the United Arab Emirates. Trott was in defiant mood this morning however, and he brought up his eighth Test century with a four through the leg side. 
It looked as if everything was going to go England's way until Trott guided a delivery from Ravichandran Ashwin to leg slip to be out for 143.
Bell batted with the class that people have been accustomed to seeing and hopefully this is a turning point in his career. He was allowed one reprieve on 75 when he was dropped by Sehwag at slip. Bell capitalised on his fortune late in the day when he completed his 17th Test century - the slowest of his international career. 
Bell and Root closed out the historic and memorable series victory to spark celebrations in the England dressing room.
England, who consolidated their second-placed position behind South Africa in the ICC Test rankings, travel to New Zealand for a three-Test series in March before hosting the Kiwis in the summer ahead of back-to-back Ashes series.

Both Trott, 143, and Bell, 116 not out, had struggled with their form for most of the series but it showed just how dominating England's performances had become as the tourists - who lost in Ahmedabad before winning in Mumbai and Kolkata - earned the draw they needed to secure an historic achievement.

 

India took just one wicket all day as debutant Joe Root finished with an unbeaten 20 to go with his 73 in the first innings.

 

With no result looking likely, time was called early to proceedings and as the bails were lifted, England were 352 for 4 with a lead of 356.

 

England's final-day dominance was fitting because, since being beaten by nine wickets in the first Test, the tourists, who have been notoriously poor on the sub-continent, have outplayed their hosts in every department.

 

While recent Ashes victories, in 2005 and the 2009-10 tour Down Under will rank as some of England's finest displays in recent years, many pundits and ex-players have described winning a Test series in India as the hardest thing to do in cricket.

 

To put some numbers behind the series win, this is only the fourth time in history England have won in India, and it is the first time since David Gower's team were triumphant in 1984-85.

 

This was the first time India had lost a home series since 2004 when the great Australia team with the likes of Glenn McGrath, Ricky Ponting, and Shane Warne and this result for England will give them a lot of confidence heading into the Ashes next Summer. 

 

Given the recent problems in the England camp, both on and off the field, it appears as though the squad has turned the corner with contributions from plenty of players.

 

Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar, after he was picked from the second Test onwards, both out-bowled India's spinners and James Anderson underlined his status as one of the best seamers in the world. 

 

A lot of the credit has to go to England's captain Alastair Cook and his pure hunger for runs which saw him pick up the man of the series award but at one time or another all of England's batsmen scored runs.

 

Trott and Bell were the two players most in need of some runs on the final day and both delivered with aplomb.

 

The Warwickshire team mates posted their highest Test scores of the year, with a century particularly welcome for Bell who averaged just 18 in India before he came to the crease when England were stuttering slightly at 94-3 on the fourth day.

 

Both Trott and Bell were part of the side in January which was bowled out for 72 against Pakistan, on their way to a series whitewash in the United Arab Emirates. Trott was in defiant mood this morning however, and he brought up his eighth Test century with a four through the leg side. 

 

It looked as if everything was going to go England's way until Trott guided a delivery from Ravichandran Ashwin to leg slip to be out for 143.

 

Bell batted with the class that people have been accustomed to seeing and hopefully this is a turning point in his career. He was allowed one reprieve on 75 when he was dropped by Sehwag at slip. Bell capitalised on his fortune late in the day when he completed his 17th Test century - the slowest of his international career. 

 

Bell and Root closed out the historic and memorable series victory to spark celebrations in the England dressing room.

 

England, who consolidated their second-placed position behind South Africa in the ICC Test rankings, travel to New Zealand for a three-Test series in March before hosting the Kiwis in the summer ahead of back-to-back Ashes series.

 

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